FBI and DEA agents to participate in Cancun’s Security Summit, Feb. 18th

A summit of security agencies and police corporations from Mexico and the United States, including representatives of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will be held next Friday, February 18, in Cancun, announced the governor of Quintana Roo, Carlos Joaquín González.

TIMES MEDIA MEXICO.- On January 27, the state government announced the forthcoming arrival of North American institutions in Quintana Roo “to work with us in matters of review, exchange of information and improvement to avoid situations such as that of the Xcaret hotel, which goes far beyond the information that we can have in terms of intelligence because we are groups that do not operate in this place, there will be the Canadian Mounted Police, the DEA, and the FBI”, he pointed out.

When questioned about the meeting with the US security agencies, the governor briefly stated that “they will come on February 18” and later indicated that the meeting will be in Cancun.

On January 21, a hitman shot three Canadian tourists at the Xcaret hotel in the Riviera Maya, where two died and one more was injured. The victims were linked to a Canadian criminal cell dedicated to drug trafficking, and it was stated that the events that occurred in Quintana Roo were planned in the North American nation.

In early February, soldiers from France, Canada, and Belize met with Army and Navy personnel in Chetumal, Quintana Roo, to exchange information and establish security strategies.

This February 18, representatives of the FBI, the DEA, and apparently the Canadian Mounted Police will meet in Cancun, with federal and state authorities, to block the path to crime and international groups, through strategies and exchange of information.

The meeting with US security agencies arose from the governor of Quintana Roo himself, days after the murder of two Canadian tourists at the Xcaret Hotel, and it became known that this crime was planned in advance due to drug debt from Canada.

The Yucatan Times
Newsroom



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