A new Monarch Butterfly sanctuary is being developed in Jiquipilco, State of Mexico

Photo: https://www.facebook.com/hashtag/gobiernomunicipaldejiquipilco/

At an altitude of 2,100 meters above sea level there is a natural treasure that seeks protection in Jiquipilco, in the north of the State of Mexico, and it is the discovery of a new monarch butterfly nucleus, which for now is only visited by members of the local community, as there is no access to visitors.

  • Before 2023, this natural migration phenomenon was only registered and seen in the state of Mexico in four sanctuaries:
  • Piedra Herrada in Valle de Bravo-Temascaltepec
  • La Mesa in San José del Rincón;
  • El Capulín
  • Macheros, in Donato Guerra.

Fifty miles from La Mesa, the monarch was attracted to the oyamel trees in Jiquipilco. There, they rest on what are known as perches, hanging from branches. As soon as the sun rises, their wings open, fluttering from one place to another.

The spectacle is not open to the public, since authorities and ejidatarios are concerned about taking care of the area and making it a permanent nucleus for this visitor and that for now it does not become a tourist area, since it is a passage for farmers and is susceptible to logging.

close up photo of monarch butterfly on top of flower
Photo by Debadutta on Pexels.com

Visitors rest on perches. The forested area is complicated because the path is steep and rocky, which requires good physical condition.

At the hibernation site, ejidatarios and local authorities said that they have already notified the state and federal government of the insect colony in order to preserve the site and to ensure that they return in subsequent years.

Pedro Enríquez, one of the ejidatarios, commented that it is a satisfaction to receive them and a source of pride, so they should work together with the authorities to conserve and protect the area’s forests.

“It is a great surprise, before there were fewer, but today a greater quantity was concentrated; the experts ask why they liked such an inappropriate place as a road of continuous passage.”

For his part, the biologist of the Jiquipilco town hall, Fidel González Romero, called on the community to avoid disturbing them, and to transit early or in the afternoon. They also asked the corresponding authorities to help them with operations against illegal logging, which has been on the rise in the region.

TYT Newsroom