Morena pushes to leave the Army on the streets

Lobbying intensifies in the Senate. Finally, after the intervention of Segob, governors, and an ambassador, Morena is moving to approve that the military remains in public security until 2028.

(CDMX – TYT) – Morena broke the opposition dam and is on the way to approving the reform that will extend the work of the Armed Forces in public security until 2028.

The lobbying campaign involved federal officials, governors, and the ambassador to Spain.

After talking with the Secretary of the Interior, PAN senator Raúl Paz Alonzo resigned from his party, the PAN and joined Morena, thus reducing from 11 to 10 the votes needed to approve the reform, promoted by PRI deputies but rejected by 11 of the 13 tricolor senators. 

In addition, according to information confirmed by Excélsior, sectors of the ruling party’s bloc claimed to have another nine votes from the opposition. Senators stated that governors sought them out to ask them to vote in favor of the reform. The ambassador to Spain, Quirino Ordaz, tweeted last night to PRI member Mario Zamora to ask him to support it.

The Senate left the first reading of the reform, which will be discussed today in the plenary, for its approval.

Lobbying for the Army reform is increasing.

Governors and even Mexico’s ambassador to Spain joined in the exhortations to approve that the military remains on the streets until 2028.

In an intense 24-hour day of lobbying, which involved the Secretary of the Interior, Adán Augusto López, governors of several states, the coordinator of Morena’s senators, and even the ambassador to Spain, Quirino Ordaz, Morena broke the opposition dam to move towards the approval of the reform that will keep the Armed Forces in public security until 2028.

Yesterday, after a conversation he had with Adán Augusto López Hernández, PAN senator Raúl Paz Alonzo resigned from his party and joined the Morena party.

Thus, Morena immediately managed to reduce from 11 to 10 the votes it needed to endorse the reform sent by the Chamber of Deputies, based on an initiative of the federal deputies of the PRI. Still, the lobbying from different governmental instances managed that last night the balance began to tilt in favor of the plans of Morena and the national PRI since according to them they had another nine confirmed votes from the opposition, so the difference is of only one vote, according to the information confirmed last night by Excélsior with parliamentary coordinators.

According to the senators themselves, several governors sought dialogue with them to ask them to vote in favor of the reform. Last night, from Madrid, the former governor of Sinaloa and now ambassador to Spain, Quirino Ordaz, published a message addressed to PRI senator Mario Zamora.

“I hope that Senator Mario Zamora supports with his vote in favor of the constitutional reform so that the National Guard continues to support the people. This reform is beneficial for the country”, he wrote. However, he was mistaken because the reform is not about the National Guard but the permanence of the Armed Forces in public security tasks.

Yesterday, the Senate plenary passed the reform in its first reading. During this fishing for votes, PRI senators working on a parallel proposal considered that support to local police forces should be recovered and should guarantee the gradual return of the military to their barracks.

According to information obtained by Excélsior, the senators are seeking a clear and firm commitment so that Morena and the federal government commit themselves to approve this proposal. However, Morena’s operation was heading towards a close result because they were confident that they would have 10 of the 11 votes they need.

In a video message published on her Twitter account, PRI member Claudia Ruiz Massieu assured: “the crisis of insecurity, violence, injustice, and impunity, which has robbed millions of Mexican families of their peace of mind, needs to be urgently addressed. “We need civilian police, well trained, well paid, and we also need Armed Forces that have clarity on what they can do and have the legal powers to do it. However, we are well aware of past mistakes, and we know that militarization is not the solution,” she said.

The Yucatan Times
Newsroom



Comments

comments