4 products from Quintana Roo are at risk of extinction

(Photo: Yucatán a la mano)

Juan Manuel Carvajal Sánchez, an academic from the Universidad del Caribe, explained that due to this situation, local producers prefer to focus on other types of crops, causing them to gradually disappear from the field.

Likewise, he pointed out that many times they reach supermarkets, but they are products that are brought from other states, such as Morelos and Puebla.

“Better grown in other places than here, we are eating sapodilla from Cuernavaca, but consuming these products in small flea markets can generate interest and return to knowledgeable agriculture,” he said.

Ignorance condemns the local fruits
According to the academics, both in the north and in the south, they have focused on growing products with greater demand, such as lemon, pineapple, and dragon fruit (pitahaya).

Another reason that has to do with this problem is the fact that endangered endemic trees such as black sapote, mamey, sapodilla, and caimito are not taken care of, and local the population of Quintana Roo (many of them from other parts of Mexico), is unaware of its uses and method of preparation, which is why the university has undertaken a rescue program for these types of crops that are important foods.

“We want to provide solutions to products that are not so easy to market because they are obsolete and most marketers do not put them in supermarkets because there is no systemic agriculture,” Carvajal Sánchez stated.

.Currently, these can be found at the Mayab Tianguis, but supermarket chains have also been able to open a section of local products.

“We already have two chains that have an island that says local products and they even included a calendar of when they are going to have them also on the YouTube channel ‘Rescatando Ingredients’ we tell you what you can do with it,” the professor from the Universidad del Caribe concluded.

The Yucatan Times
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