Business sector denounces 150 energy projects stopped in Mexico due to AMLO’s energy policy

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In the Open Parliament on the Electricity Reform, the CCE said that there are more than 150 detained energy projects, which are equivalent to an investment of 40 billion US dollars

(MEXICO – CCE).- The Business Coordinating Council (CCE) denounced that there are 150 clean energy projects detained with a value of 40 billion dollars due to the uncertainty of the energy policy promoted by the Government.

The leader of the business organism participated in the forum “Economic and financial impacts for the CFE (Federal Electricity Commission) and the public finances of the electrical reforms” within the open parliament of Congress to discuss the initiative of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

The reform proposal, sent last September, causes controversy because it would limit private participation in electricity generation to 46 percent to favor CFE, a state company.

In addition, it would eliminate autonomous energy regulators, review previous contracts and prioritize CFE’s fossil plants over private renewables.

“That all Mexicans have access to enough cheap and clean energy. We want a strong, vigorous, efficient, productive and competitive Federal Electricity Commission, but this reform proposal does not achieve what the president wants for Mexico,” Salazar said in Congress.

In the forum, Miguel Reyes, director of CFE Energía, responded that the State company “subsidizes”, according to him, private generators with 490 billion pesos.

He also alleged that private companies produce 82 percent of their energy from fossil sources and are responsible for 52 percent of national carbon dioxide emissions in the electricity sector.

Instead, the president of the CCE asserted that the CFE has not made the necessary investments despite collecting 46 billion pesos from the transmission rate alone in 2021.

Likewise, he reproached that the reform intends to return Mexico “to a model that is already exceeded”, since the Mexican population has almost tripled in recent decades and the economy has grown at least eight times.

Regarding the complaints from the Government, which has accused the companies of “operating illegally,” Salazar replied that “a constitutional reform is not required to apply the law.”

“An efficient electricity system, which combines the stewardship of the State with the market and private investment, requires a firm, but fair and independent regulation, which prevents abuses and compensates unjustified losses to the participants,” he concluded.

The Yucatan Times
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