New York City has its Mexico-Tenochtitlan Avenue

The plate of the new Mexico-Tenochtitlan Avenue, at the intersection of 116th Street and Second Avenue in East Harlem, in Manhattan, New York. (GOVERNMENT OF MEXICO)

Chancellor Marcelo Ebrard and the Mayor of New York inaugurate a street to recognize the efforts of the Mexican community in the United States

MEXICO, (November 23, 2021).- The Mexico-Tenochtitlan avenue can already be traveled in New York. The authorities of Mexico and the United States have unveiled this Monday the Mexico-Tenochtitlan Avenue plate, at the intersection of 116th Street and Second Avenue in the East Harlem neighborhood, in Manhattan. The objective of this “unprecedented initiative” is “to recognize the efforts and contributions of the Mexican community in the United States,” as stated by the head of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (SRE) of Mexico, Marcelo Ebrard.

To the rhythm of the mariachi, the avenue has been inaugurated in one of the New York neighborhoods with the most Latino presence. Songs like Cielito Lindo and Viva México, Viva América have enlivened the event led by Ebrard and the mayor of New York, Bill de Blasio. The ceremony was also attended by officials Juan Ramón de la Fuente, permanent representative of Mexico to the United Nations, and the consul general, Jorge Islas. As well as community leaders and merchants on 116th Street, where there are several Mexican businesses.

“New York is a Mexican city too,” said De Blasio during the inauguration of the road. The mayor has said that “Americans should appreciate” that the country is changing. “In a few decades, this will be first and foremost a Latin country and that is part of our growth and evolution, and it will be led by our Mexican-American community that has already helped to deeply shape our history,” he emphasized.

The new Mexico-Tenochtitlan highway crosses eastern Manhattan on a stretch of Harlem’s Second Avenue. This artery reinforces Mexico’s presence in the ‘Big Apple’, according to the Foreign Ministry in a statement . As examples of this, he lists the cultural event Mexico Week: Day of the Dead that took place in late October and early November at the Rockefeller Center, in addition to the lighting of the Empire State Building with the colors of the Mexican flag during the celebrations of Independence, in September.

Source: El Pais

The Yucatan Times Newsroom



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