Who were the most powerful Mayan gods?

The Maya believed in a large number of nature-centric gods, some of whom were considered to be more important than others. But who was the most powerful? Well, the following gods were undoubtedly regarded as some of the most mighty and significant deities in the Mayan pantheon.

Itzamna
All ancient civilizations had their own gods, from Osiris the Egyptian god of the underworld to the Irish Dagda, who was the god of life and death. The Mayans were no exception. The pantheon of the Maya contained more than 250 gods, and the Maya built many temples to worship their deities. If you want to get a feel for the Mayan civilization, you can play Book of Maya slot at Casumo Ireland, which is set in an ancient Mayan temple. You can further get to know what it felt like to be a Maya by learning more about their powerful gods. Unfortunately, much information about the ancient gods of the Maya has been lost, due to the mass burning of their texts in 1562 by Bishop Diego de Landa. But we do still have some knowledge about many of the Mayan gods.

Itzamna was the most important Mayan god, despite usually being depicted as a large-nosed, toothless old man. But appearances can be deceptive. Itzamna is the god of fire and the son of the creator god Hunab Ku. According to the Maya, he created the earth and rules heaven day and night. He also gave the Maya their writing and calendar. His name is believed to translate as “lizard house.”

Kukulcán
You are probably aware of the magnificent Mayan Chichen Itza pyramid. But you may not know that the pyramid was used as a temple to worship Kukulcán, the so-called “feathered serpent.” He was often depicted as dragon-like and he was the primary god of the latter part of Mayan civilization. In addition to Chichen Itza, large temples to Kukulcán can be found throughout the north of Yucatán Peninsula, including Uxmal and Mayapan. As you may know, stories are still told about Kukulcán among the modern Yucatec people, and there are now many varying stories about the deity. For instance, among the modern Lacandon Maya of Chiapas, Kukulcán is an evil snake who is kept by the sun god as a pet.

Chaac
You may not be aware, but cloud seeding technology can make it rain. The weather is manipulated by shooting silver iodine or other chemicals into clouds in order to encourage precipitation. But back in the day of the Maya, all that was needed was the powerful raid god Chaac. He used a lightning ax to strike the clouds and make it rain. Though in another legend, Chaac is said to have committed adultery with his brother’s spouse and after Chaac was punished, every time he cried, the rain fell. In the Yucatán Peninsula, Chaac is considered the protector of agriculture. Chaac certainly looks powerful. He is usually depicted as having bulging eyes, a large nose, and a body of reptilian scales.

Huracan
Huracan, also known as Bolon Tzacab, and whose name is believed to mean “one leg,” was the Mayan god of wind, fire, and storms. He held an important place in the Mayan pantheon of deities because he was one of the gods who attempted to create humanity. According to the Maya, the feat was attempted three times. The Mayans also believed Huracan caused the Great Flood, which is recognized in many different ancient civilizations around the world, after the second generation of humans angered the gods. Huracan, whose name is the origin of “hurricane,” is undoubtedly one of the most powerful Mayan gods. You would not want to anger him, that is for sure.



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