Public works budget to be cut next year

The CMIC estimates that 2022 will not be promising for micro and small companies in the sector.

Mérida, Yucatán.- The 2022 federal budget could include fewer public works than this year, which will impact small and micro companies in the construction sector, according to CMIC.

The president of the Mexican Chamber of the Construction Industry (CMIC) Yucatán delegation, Raúl Aguilar Baqueiro, said that there is not much hope for an increase in federal public works next year.

“The problem in this industry is that local micro and small companies, due to their commercial dynamics, have depended one hundred percent on public works, and this has unfortunately decreased, particularly in the last three years the drop has been more drastic,” he said.

The leader pointed out that despite the fact that the Tren Maya is generating jobs and resources for the construction sector, it is not enough for small companies, which is why they have had to look for options in the private sector.

“They are having a hard time finding or changing markets, although it is true that we have a large federal project in Yucatán, which is the Tren Maya and generates an important economic flow, it is not possible for micro and small construction companies to work on this railroad plan,” he said.

Aguilar Baqueiro acknowledged that large infrastructure projects for the entity are vital to boost the construction industry and that in view of the complicated financial scenario due to the coronavirus pandemic and budget reductions by the Federal Government, the private investment represents important support.

“The best bet we have to move forward at the end of this fiscal year is that private investment generates more works and infrastructure, especially in the face of the reduction of resources by the Federation,” he said.

Finally, the CMIC president considered that the slow reactivation of the sector is largely due to the lack of public investment for infrastructure since the resources that reach the states are insufficient.

The Yucatan Times Newsroom



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