INAH launches contest to stop deterioration of the Feathered Serpent Pyramid in Teotihuacan

Photo: (Arqueologia Mexicana)

STATE OF MEXICO, (August 03, 2021).- In 1921, the archaeologist Manuel Gamio concluded the exploration and restoration of the Pyramid of the Feathered Serpent, in the Teotihuacan area, from that moment began a race against the clock for its conservation.

A century after the discovery of this Historical Monument, the Federal Secretary of Culture, through the National Institute of Anthropology and History ( INAH ), launched the International Feathered Serpent Contest, the purpose of which is to design an integral protection cover for this building considered one of the most beautiful in pre-Hispanic Mexico.

In a press conference held in the Archaeological Zone of Teotihuacan, the general director of INAH, Diego Prieto Hernández, and the state secretary of Culture and Tourism, Marcela González Salas, announced the bases and requirements of this call, already available in the official site: https://convocatoriapse.inah.gob.mx/

It is expected that from this competition an architectural roof project will emerge that guarantees the conservation, and contributes to the stabilization of the pre-Hispanic building, in order to cushion the main causes of deterioration associated with the weathering to which the archaeological monument is subjected, and that affect, especially, on its main facade.

Deterioration of the pyramid has accelerated in the last 18 years

The anthropologist Diego Prieto commented that given this problem, which has accelerated in the last 18 years, at the end of 2015 an academic, multidisciplinary and inter-institutional commission was formed, among whose members are renowned archaeologists.

These specialists were invited to prepare a complete diagnosis using state-of-the-art technology and design conservation solutions that take into account structural, physical, chemical, and environmental conditions.

It also pointed out that with the support of the Government of the State of Mexico, between 2017 and 2018, a team was set up in the pyramidal structure to periodically monitor changes in climate, temperature, and exposure to factors such as rain, sun, and wind.

Contest offers a prize of 600 thousand pesos

The contest will take place in three stages: registration (from October 4 to 8, 2021); the notification of those selected (October 25), and the visit to the archaeological zone to learn about the conservation problems, which will be followed by the preliminary design and elaboration of the architectural project (in 2022).

The jury will define the winner, who will be awarded a prize of 600 thousand pesos and the other two finalist projects will receive a prize of 30 thousand pesos each.

Source: ADN 40

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