The Government of Yucatan is accused of ‘Culturicide’ after leaving Macay Art Museum resourceless

Mérida, MX.- The Ateneo de Yucatán Museum of Contemporary Art, better known as MACAY, has closed its doors indefinitely after its directors alleged that the Government of Yucatan broke the collaboration agreement and the resources received were used as part of the maintenance of the area.

The director of MACAY, Rafael Alfonso Pérez y Pérez, described the fact of leaving this space without support and resources as ‘cultural murder’.

They claim that the ‘Culturicide’ would be committed by the State Government, headed by governor Mauricio Vila Dosal.

Rafael Alonso Pérez y Pérez exposed that they were recently informed of the lack of budget destined for this museum, so they resorted to asking for federal support, but so far they have had no answers.

“This is a symbolic closure until we can analyze and look for a way to work on behalf of the citizens of Yucatan,” he said.

The agreement established by the State Government with MACAY dates back to 1993 and since then the resources provided have been used to maintain the place, as well as the art pieces that are exhibited.

“We ask citizens to join the defense of the rights derived from access to culture, we call on the Federal Government, the federal Sedeculta, the Human Rights Commission, local and federal legislators since it is not only the closure of a space, but it is a “Culturicide,” he said at a press conference.

As part of the complaints, he recalled that in 2018 they received about 9 million pesos and in 2019 the budget was reduced to 4 million pesos. Subsequently, for 2021, they received just two million pesos in the first semester, but until yesterday they were informed that they would not receive any more resources.

The importance of the existence of this space, he said, is because it is the only contemporary art museum in the entire southeast and its closure would mean an artistic setback for the region and, above all, for the state.

The Yucatan Times
Newsroom



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