What do Mexico and Brazil think about the US election?

The U.S. elections are just one week away and the eyes of the world are watching.

Here are the views from over a dozen countries, reported by the ABC News team around the world from Sao Paulo to Seoul and Hong Kong to Havana.

Mexico

Mexico is very pleased to be somehow absent from the 2020 campaign after serving as what many called an electoral piñata for Donald Trump in 2016.

PHOTO: People watch the first 2020 presidential campaign debate between President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, at the Pinche Gringo restaurant in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 29, 2020. (Carlos Jasso/Reuters, FILE)
PHOTO: People watch the first 2020 presidential campaign debate between President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, at the Pinche Gringo restaurant in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 29, 2020. (Carlos Jasso/Reuters, FILE)

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, or AMLO, has a good relationship with President Trump, but could have a better one with former Vice President Joe Biden as his potential presidency will mean less pressure with issues including a border wall and migration from Central America. After Trump forced AMLO to toughen his immigration policy or face penalties, a Biden victory could mean a complete reset in the narrative and a more “humanitarian” immigration policy, as it used to be.

Anne Laurent reported from Mexico City

Brazil

Both Trump and Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro share an ideology defined by its conservatism and populism.

Bolsonaro needs Trump in the White House to legitimize his presidency in Brazil and to give him a mandate for a second run. If Trump loses, Bolsonaro will be more isolated on the world stage and at home.

Sources close to Bolsonaro and in his administration have expressed deep concern about the U.S. elections and what a change in administration could mean for the relationship. One person close to Bolsonaro and his wife Michelle said she is praying to God every day for Trump to win.

In particular, Brazil needs economic and technological partnerships with the U.S., including new military technologies and membership in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, or OECD. While Trump declared Brazil a major non-NATO ally and backed its bid for OECD membership, a Biden White House could be more difficult — given disagreements on human rights, climate change, the Amazon and more.

Aicha El Hammar Castano reported from Brussels

PHOTO: In this Sept. 7, 2020, file photo, a supporter of the right-wing Brazilian president holds up a sign on the Brazilian Independence Day. (Myke Sena/picture alliance via Getty Images, FILE)
PHOTO: In this Sept. 7, 2020, file photo, a supporter of the right-wing Brazilian president holds up a sign on Brazilian Independence Day. (Myke Sena/picture alliance via Getty Images, FILE)

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