George W. Bush and Mitt Romney won’t support Trump in 2020

Former President George W. Bush and Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah won’t support President Donald Trump’s re-election, and other GOP officials are considering voting for Joe Biden, according to The New York Times.

The Times credits the early fallout to Trump’s handling of police brutality protests and a mishandling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Some GOP officials have been public about their dilemma while attempting to balance conscience, ideology, and risk to themselves and their agenda. 

John Kelly, Trump’s former chief of staff and a retired Marine general, wouldn’t disclose who had his vote, but he did say that he wished “we had some additional choices,” according to The Times.

President Donald Trump may be losing the support of members of his own party already, with some GOP officials considering a vote for Joe Biden.

Sooner than expected, growing numbers of big Republican names are debating how transparent to be about their decision not to back his re-election, or may even vote for the presumptive Democratic nominee, Joe Biden. 

According to The New York Times, Former President George W. Bush and Senator Mitt Romney won’t support Trump’s re-election, Jeb Bush isn’t sure how he’ll vote, and Cindy McCain, the widow of Sen. John McCain, is almost certain to support Biden but is “unsure how public to be about it because one of her sons is eying a run for office.”

Former Republican leaders like the former Speakers Paul Ryan and John Boehner are still tight-lipped about who they’ll vote for, and some Republicans are reportedly weighing their options between backing a third-party contender or openly endorsing Biden, risking the ire of Trump. Some say they’d possibly prefer a Biden victory if the GOP managed to preserve its Senate majority. 

Dissenters are reportedly feeling a renewed urgency due to Trump’s incendiary response to the protests against police brutality and the mishandling of the coronavirus pandemic, according to anonymous sources. Retired military leaders, typically private about their personal political views, have grown increasingly vocal about unease with the president’s leadership, but are still undecided about embracing an opponent.

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