The Ministry of Tourism confirms it: Long weekends are over.

Lopez Obrador has decided to cancel the three long weekends established in the Federal Labor Law.

MEXICO CITY (Times Media Mexico) – Tourism Secretary Miguel Torruco confirmed that after a meeting with Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador and the head of the Economic Cabinet, Alfonso Romo, it was agreed that “the civic-historical dates” of the country would be respected, thus cancelling the three long weekends established in the Federal Labor Law.

The official said that as an alternative, the school calendar will be adjusted in coordination with the Ministry of Education.

“The next alternative is to adjust the school calendar in coordination with the head of the SEP, Esteban Moctezuma, to promote through new bridges family togetherness and travel to the 134 tourist sites to strengthen domestic tourism and economically benefit the local population,” he said through his Twitter account.

Last Wednesday, February 5, Lopez Obrador, made public that once the current school year ends, he will send a reform initiative to Congress so that holidays will take place on historical dates and will not be used to create long weekends, because “Mexicans no longer remember their importance”… “At the end of the current school year, I am going to propose reforms (to the law) to return to historical dates, so that the day on which a historical date is commemorated, certainly the most important ones, the transcendental ones,” (SIC) AMLO said in a morning conference.

The proposal will continue despite the rejection of the tourism sector that has shown its discontent with the measure.  The National Association of Hotel Chains made clear in a letter that long weekends represent an income for hotels, restaurants, travel agencies, transportation companies and other services related to the rest industry.

“On January 29th, you reported through a statement that for the holiday period from Friday January 31st to Monday February 3rd, end of long weekends that celebrate the anniversary of the Mexican Constitution, would leave around 1’600,000 vacationers who would leave an income of $4 billion pesos,’ said the organization to Torruco in a letter.

Like the The National Association of Hotel Chains, the Mexican Association of Hotels and Motels, the Union of Secretaries of Tourism of Mexico, the Mexican Association of Travel Agents (AMAV), the Mexican Federation of Tourism Associations (FEMATUR), among others, have shown their rejection and has warned of the effects on the sector.

It should be noted that this will have a major impact on the attraction of national tourism and is a hard blow to the industry, which is currently a fundamental part of Mexico’s Gross Domestic Product.  

The Yucatan Times
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