Mexico to digitalize cenotes in Yucatán and Quintana Roo

The Great Mayan Aquifer Project (GAM) will digitalize the cenotes located in Yucatán and Quintana Roo and the results will be presented in a simultaneous exhibition in three countries: the national anthropology museums in Mexico and Switzerland and the National Geographic Museum in the United States.

In total, six cenotes will be digitalized and for that, the GAM received a donation for USD $100,000 from Switzerland’s Culture Ministry.

Recommended: Archeologists unveil the secrets of the Great Mayan Aquifer

With this kind of works, said archeologist Guillermo de Anda, director of GAM, we contribute to another kind of preservation and, in addition, if any archeological vestiges are found, they will not be moved from their site.

“The objective of the Great Mayan Aquifer project is to maintain the sites without alterations. The idea is to create reproductions available to the public and create virtual museums” explained De Anda.

Regarding archeological vestiges, said the director of GAM, they have only found a skull that is particularly interesting for its characteristics; “It’s concreted in the keystone, that is, it probably is thousands of years old, when the cave was dry, and it has two important marks in the right parietal, probably caused by a megafauna that took a head inside this cave. We have not found any other bone.”

Recommended: Mayan culture meets the digital world

“In Quintana Roo, we will work in the God of Commerce cenote, which is part of the Sac Actún System, the largest flooded cave in the world, while, in the Chichén Itzá Archeological Site, we will focus in the Holtún cenote, which, although it has been widely studied on its shallow regions, is home to many elements like basins, Tláloc sculptures, and anthropomorphic representations in its deepest sections, from 40 to 45 meters deep,” added De Anda.

The Great Mayan Aquifer Project (GAM) will digitalize the cenotes located in Yucatán and Quintana Roo and the results will be presented in a simultaneous exhibition in three countries: the national anthropology museums in Mexico and Switzerland and the National Geographic Museum in the United States.

In total, six cenotes will be digitalized and for that, the GAM received a donation for USD $100,000 from Switzerland’s Culture Ministry.

With this kind of works, said archeologist Guillermo de Anda, director of GAM, we contribute to another kind of preservation and, in addition, if any archeological vestiges are found, they will not be moved from their site.

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

English below. . El acuífero peninsular está formado por extensas redes de cuevas inundadas en las cuales se encuentran incontables piezas arqueológicas y paleontológicas. Es por eso que en el proyecto Gran Acuífero Maya, nos damos a la tarea de recorrer este laberinto en buscas de piezas que nos ayudan a contar la historia milenaria de la península y de quienes la han habitado. . . 📷: @karla.ortega.mx . The peninsular aquifer is formed by extensive networks of flooded caves in which countless archaeological and paleontological pieces are found. That is why in the Great Maya Aquifer project, we are given the task of roaming this labyrinth in search of pieces that help us tell the ancient story of the peninsula and those who have inhabited it.

Una publicación compartida de Proyecto Gran Acuífero Maya (@proyectogam) el

The director of GAM said regarding archeological vestiges,we have only found a skull that is particularly interesting for its characteristics; it’s concreted in the keystone, that is why there is reason to believe it is probably thousands of years old, when the cave was dry, and it has two important marks in the right parietal, probably caused by megafauna that took a head inside this cave. We have not found any other bone.”

“In Quintana Roo, we will work in the God of Commerce cenote, which is part of the Sac Actún System, the largest flooded cave in the world, while, in the Chichén Itzá Archeological Site, we will focus in the Holtún cenote, which, although it has been widely studied on its shallow regions, is home to many elements like basins, Tláloc sculptures, and anthropomorphic representations in its deepest sections, from 40 to 45 meters deep,” added De Anda.

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

English below. . Los ecosistemas de la península de Yucatán depende enormemente del Gran Acuífero Maya, los cenotes son un recordatorio de este maravilloso sistema. . Llevamos a cabo una investigación en un cenote durante una tarde en la que las nubes y la lluvia se hicieron presentes. En la foto, Guillermo de Anda, Director del Proyecto Gran Acuífero Maya, explorador de la National Geographic Society e Investigador del Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH). . . . The ecosystems of the Yucatan Peninsula depend greatly on the Great Maya Aquifer, the cenotes are a reminder of this wonderful system. . We conducted an investigation in a cenote during an afternoon in which clouds and rain were present. In the photo, Guillermo de Anda, Director of the Great Maya Aquifer Project, explorer of the National Geographic Society and Researcher of the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH).

Una publicación compartida de Proyecto Gran Acuífero Maya (@proyectogam) el

The event for the announcement of the donation was also attended by Eric Mayoraz, Switzerland’s ambassador to Mexico, and Pedro Francisco Sánchez Nava, Archeology coordinator of Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH).

Sánchez Nava stressed that the collaboration in order for the Great Mayan Aquifer to be considered a Mixed World Heritage Site by UNESCO will take approximately three years.

The Yucatan Times
Newsroom


Comments

comments

doctoranytime BUSQUE A UN MÉDICO