Are 52 million pesos enough to address the Sargasso issue in Quintana Roo?

The Mexican Navy Secretariat (SEMAR) will invest 52 million pesos to address the  Sargasso issue in the coasts of Quintana Roo.

Admiral Secretary Raúl Ojeda indicated that work is also being carried out on the construction of a government sargacera (a seaweed processing plant), which will be operating in approximately two years.

AMLO declared that the Sargasso problem is not an emergency, and guaranteed that the crisis will be resolved.

“This problem, like others, has been magnified to question the new government, but there is no cause for concern,” AMLO declared.

For his part, Governor Carlos Joaquín González highlighted the coordinated work between the three government orders. He noted that efforts have been redoubled and work will continue to give timely attention to this problem, which according to the president “is not so serious”.

The Admiral Secretary stressed that a sargacero ship is being repaired and is expected to be fully operational as soon as possible.

According to SEMAR, of the 52 million pesos that are counted for the fight against sargassum, 30 million pesos will be destined for the construction of 4 sargazzo processing plants; 5.5 million for the purchase of a sweeper; 14.5 million for the acquisition of sargasso retention barriers; one million pesos for the purchase of materials and equipment to support the “Operation Sargazo 2019” and one million more will be used for the installation of two “scatterometers on the coasts of Quintana Roo”.

Scatterometer (Photo: archive)

scatterometer or diffusionmeter is a scientific instrument to measure the return of a beam of light or radar waves scattered by diffusion in a medium such as air. Diffusionmeters using visible light are found in airports or along roads to measure horizontal visibility. Radar scatterometers use radio or microwaves to determine the normalized radar cross section(σ0, “sigma zero” or “sigma naught”) of a surface. They are often mounted on weather satellites to find wind speed and direction, and are used in industries to analyze the roughness of surfaces.

 

The Riviera Maya Times
Newsroom



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