(Photo: yucatan.com.mx)

The group of horchateras known as “Muuch meyaj ko’olelob” of the municipality of Chacsinkin, Yucatán, was formed 26 years ago and although they have managed to be known in the State, they have not yet been able to acquire all the equipment they need to industrialize their production, so they continue manufacturing this drink in a traditional way using hand mills.

Rosa Canché Mukul, president, and Hermelinda Mukul Alcocer, member of the group, said that over the years they have become known and the horchatas they make are increasingly in demand, however, they require equipment to industrialize their production because they still use hand mills for the elaboration.

The group is made up of eight members and the sales help them generate income to support their families.

Because they have been dedicated to this activity for several years, they have participated in exhibitions and even travel to Mexico City from time to time to sell their horchatas.

There are three varieties of horchata that they make: rice, jamaica and tamarindo, which we sell at $ 30 a bottle. The women indicated that they took about 240 pieces of each flavor to sell on Reforma Avenue, in Mexico City. In addition, they attended the exhibitions to which they are invited.

The Yucatecan women pointed out that they have not been able to grow their business, because they require equipment to process the ingredients of the beverages and a packaging machinery, in order to make the work more agile and efficient.

“When we grind the rice for the horchata, we use hand mills and when packaging it we do it manually because we do not have the equipment necessary to do it any other way,” said Rosa Canché.

Agua de Horchata (Archive)

The women explained that they could increase the production signficantly, if they had the necessary equipment, so they hope to get it or receive support from some government agency or private company.

The members of the group recalled that they began working as a group when they received funding from the National Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples (CDI), but they do not have that economic support anymore.

They assured that the idea to form the group of horchateras and to have a business of their own was born when they realized the difficulties that their husbands were going through to make a living for their families.

TYT Newsroom with information from yucatan.com.mx



Comments

comments

more recommended stories