“Doctor a Domicilio” a social program to benefit the most vulnerable people in Yucatan

(Photo: yucatan.com.mx)

Before 7 am, nurses, social workers, doctors, promoters and nutritionists gather at the building of the Ministry of Health of the State Government. They have a special mission, which is to take the “Medic at Home” (Médico a domicilio) project to the 106 municipalities of Yucatan. The project was launched statewide last Monday October 29 in Izamal by Governor Mauricio Vila Dosal.

This proposal was implemented with the intention of bringing health services to the people of Yucatan who, due to their vulnerable situation, do not have the possibility of attending a clinic or request the assistance of a medical specialist.

The priority
The Médico a domicilio or “Domiciliary Doctor” campaign considers as a priority to reach the homes of those who suffer some disabilities, live in conditions of abandonment or pregnant women who do not have access to a prenatal control program.

First results
A week after its inauguration, this program has already started helping families from the communities of Motul and Umán. Such is the case of Baldina Ake Chi, 53, a neighbor of the Hotzuc rural community, in the municipality of Uman, who is lying in her hammock under the care of her father, Don Juan, 85, whose mobility depends on a cane.

Baldina thanked the help because she has been suffering the consequences of diabetes and hypertension for several years. During the consultation, she could not contain the tears because her main complaint is that her eyes hurt, in addition to being visually impaired.

The patient told Dr. David Gonzalez that she has had diarrhea for days and her medical consultations are in Umán or at the Santa María de Mérida clinic. However, she had an appointment in the state capital a few days ago, and could not get there because they charge her 200 pesos round trip. “I don’t care if I can not see, I just want is my eyes to stop hurting,” she says.

Médico a Domicilio” Photo: yucatan.com.mx

Mrs. Ake Chi was attended by a medical brigade headed by María Fabiola Alonso Sánchez, 36, who specializes in nutrition, and David González Sáenz, a surgeon. The crew carries out the corresponding medical check up, provides the necessary medicines and writes down the corresponding information and data to do the proper follow up on her case.

At 28 years of age, Esther was presented with a condition that left her paralized and without the ability to speak, move or do anything by herself. Her condition stopped her from going to her periodic checkups too.

However, after receiving the visit of one of the “Médico a Domicilio” brigades at her home, she is now given a strict medical control for her health condition, without extra expenses for transportation.

Médico a Domicilio” Photo: yucatan.com.mx

Where did the project start?
The Secretary of Health, Mauricio Sauri Vivas, reported that the unit started the program in the communities of Hotzuc, Yaxcopoil, Poxilá, Xtepén, Oxcum, Ticimul, Tanil, Tebec and Dzibikak, all of them within the municipality of Uman.

In Motul, the program started in the towns of Komchén Martínez, Santa Teresa, San Pedro Chacabal, Chacmay, San José Pitbuch, San Antonio Chuc, Onichén, Tzalam and Chumbec.

Sauri Vivas recalled that the program will provide comprehensive and interdisciplinary health care at home with consultations to people who have difficulty moving to a health center for any physical, social or mental limitation, such patients with disabilities, chronic or terminal conditions, as well as elderly patients and pregnant women who do not have prenatal care.

Help for more than 470 thousand Yucatecans
“Once it is in full operation, “Médico a Domicilio” will benefit annually 2,547 pregnant women, 106,248 patients with chronic diseases, 112,389 people with disabilities and 252, 890 senior citizens, which means that more than 470,000 Yucatecans from all over the state will be able to count on this benefit for their health care,” he said.

TYT Newsroom with information from yucatan.com.mx



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