New air services between Mexico and the Middle East approved

New air services between Mexico and the middle east has been approved that will see passengers arriving into the country from Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

In a meeting between the Asia-Pacific United Commissions of Foreign Affairs and Mexican Foreign Affairs, an agreement was unanimously approved that would see the opening of air services between Mexico and three countries in the Middle East, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

Legislators who participated in the meeting stressed that the agreement is very important for Mexico for two reasons. One, Qatar, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia are looking to diversify their economic activity from the oil sector to tourism, real estate, telecommunications and infrastructure among others. Such activities would benefit Mexican workers and companies.

“Mexico sells engines, refrigeration appliances and agricultural products such as honey, tuna and avocados to these countries. With this agreement, we are going to see more companies reach those countries more easily and more workers have a better future,” the agreement states.

 

The second reason the agreement was approved was for Mexico to receive more tourists from these countries, benefiting, in particular, Quintana Roo since it is the state with the largest tourist figures in the country.

The agreement will also serve to expedite commercial routes and the exchange of human resources including professors, intellectuals and scientists who contribute to the cultural exchange between Mexico and the Middle East.

Darío Flota Ocampo, director of the Tourism Promotion Trust of Quintana Roo noted that the Moscow-Cancun flight has also recently been renewed with Azur Air landing last week carrying 432 passengers into the Cancun airport.

He says on average, Russian tourists say between 10 and 12 nights with an average expenditure of $500 per day and that the renewal of the flight will help generate more Russian tourists to the Mexican Caribbean.

Source: Riviera Maya Times



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