Sotuta de Peón "Hacienda Viva" (Photo: haciendaviva.com)

According to the experts, in Yucatan there are currently more than a thousand haciendas, some smaller than others, some more luxurious than others, some of them even abandoned and falling apart in the middle of the Yucatecan rainforest.

But many of these haciendas have been turned into spas, boutique hotels or recreation centers, a few of them with a greater emphasis on promotion, but there is no doubt that haciendas are one of the main treasures of the region because of their history and beauty.

The Sotuta de Peón ranch is located in the municipality of Tech and it also known as the “hacienda viva” (alive hacienda), since people in there still work with the plant of henequen, that was once known as the “green gold of Yucatan”.

Sotuta de Peón “Hacienda Viva” (Photo: haciendaviva.com)

It is said that the main house of the Hacienda Sotuta de Peón went through a restoration process that took more than 20 years to achieve the results that can be observed today and that makes the visitor feel, as he/she has made a trip to the past, while watching the henequen fields and workers dressed as in the 19th century fashion.

Besides the main house, you can swim in the cenote, see the “trucks” transporting the agave plants on rails, pulled by horses and mules, and if you have the chance, you will meet Don Antonio, who is one of the first workers of the Peón family and still lives in this Hacienda.

In his time-off, Don Antonio likes to talk to the visitors about the memorial times of abundance and plenitude in this historic hacienda, and the best part, is that Don Antonio tells these tales in Mayan language (with an English translator, of course)… so it is an attraction you cannot miss.

Although the farm still works with henequen, it is not exported anymore, as it is no longer profitable. Now the Sotuta de Peón farm is kept alive thanks to the tourism that comes to stay in its beautiful cabins and also to those who only want to learn more about the transformation of henequen.

Full article by Alejandro Gómez for: Sipse.com (Spanish)





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