Uncontrolled invasion of the mangrove area in Progreso, Yucatan

(Photo: laverdadnoticias.com)

The problem of the Progreso mangrove zone in Yucatan enters a new chapter, since people who previously lived in this place and who were relocated to one of the communities south of the port, leased the property where they had been relocated to someone else, and returned to live to the mangrove area, which has caused the municipality to file three complaints on these irregular events.

According to the coordinator of the Department of Ecology, Edilberto Quezada Dominguez, years ago, federal, state and municipal authorities made an effort to relocate several families that had invaded the swamp near Fraccionamiento Flamboyanes; however, some time later, many of those citizens that were benefited with housing in the area, once again invaded the mangrove zone.

Because of the above, the Department of Ecology raised three formal complaints against the invaders, who live in deplorable and unhealthy conditions, so it was also noted that the authorities are pending to act immediately and evict these people off the area.

On the other hand, residents of the place, who requested anonymity, stated that local authorities have not complied with the water tanks that they promised, besides that nothing has been done to clean the marsh, much less enclose it as it was also promised by municipal authorities.

The place is full of garbage, junk and other types of solid waste. To make matters worse, several neighbors complained about the garbage collection service. “In addition to garbage, another problem is the total lack of street lighting,” said Rosa Ramírez, a resident of Flamboyanes.

In that sense, Don Elmer Zaldívar recalled that the invasion took place many years ago. “In the last 40 years the fill of the swamp went from a small number of houses to almost three blocks full of shacks. Today the invasion is out of control as more amd more shacks are being built”, he concluded.

Source: laverdadnoticias.com







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