Chetumal is booming with substantial migration from other parts of Mexico

Quintana Roo’s state capital is trying to evolve into a world-class travel destination, and all the tourism activity of the city gravitates around Chetumal Bay.

If you want to admire its natural attractions, you can visit the north part of the Bay, Punta Estrella and Catalán, Calderitas Bay, or Tamalcab Island.

If you enjoy water sports, you can sail one of the canals all the way to Guerrero Lake, almost 2 hours away from the state capital.

If you drive along Chetumal’s boulevard you can get to Calderitas, a fishermen’s cove where you can find exquisite gastronomy based on the fruits of the sea.

(Photo: eruopcar.com)

Downtown Chetumal boasts a peculiar Buenosairean style, and there tourists can find sites such as the Museum of Culture, the Botanical Zoo or the palace of Government with its interesting murals.

Chetumal is an important port for the region and operates as Mexico’s main trading gateway with the neighboring country of Belize.

Goods are transported via a terrestrial road connecting Chetumal with Belize City to the south, and also via coastal merchant ships. Of course, there is an international airport in Chetumal that is in constant growth in terms of connectivity.

Chetumal’s economy has been influenced by its proximity to the border with Belize. A goods and services tax-free zone (Corozal Free Zone) established on the Belizean side attracts many visitors to Chetumal and also provides a ready market for Chetumal’s retailers and traders.

The population of Chetumal was small (about 5,000 in 1950) until the construction of highways linking it to the rest of Mexico in the 1960s and 1970s; and the city is now booming with substantial migration from other parts of Mexico.

Source: revistabuenviaje.com







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