Mexico, Belize and Guatemala seek creation of the first trinational Protected Natural Area for jaguars

Alejandro del Mazo, head of the National Commission of Protected Natural Areas (Conanp) explained that Mexico reported that it seeks to create the first trinational Protected Natural Area (ANP) to conserve the jaguar. (Photo: Sexenio.com.mx)

Alejandro del Mazo, head of the National Commission of Protected Natural Areas (Conanp) explained that Mexico reported that it seeks to create the first trinational Protected Natural Area (ANP) to conserve the jaguar and the Mayan jungle, shared with Belize and Guatemala.

During his participation in the International Jaguar 2030 Forum held at the headquarters of the United Nations (UN), commented on the cultural and ecological value that keeps the figure of this feline animal for the country, this from the pre-Hispanic era.

He also highlighted the country’s participation in the protection of the jaguar at a national level, helping the feline population grow by 10% in the last eight years within the Yucatan Peninsula.

The creation of this protected area has resulted in the stoppage of deforestation, as well as in a greater promotion of productive sustainable practices in Mexico.

To see incredible pictures of jaguars in the wild click here

In addition, the Conanp reported the publication of a protocol to improve livestock practices and deal with cases of capture and relocation, this protocol is unique in the world.

The jaguar is the largest endemic feline in the Americas, with its historical geographical distribution ranging from the southern United States to northern Argentina. In Mexico, it is found along the slopes of the Gulf and the Pacific, the central states, and obviously, in the Yucatan Peninsula.

Click here to enjoy amazing photographs of a jaguar killing an alligator

A total population of about four thousand is recorded, being Quintana Roo the region with the most important populations of the species, with growing numbers in the states of Campeche and Chiapas.

This forum was carried out by the organizations Panthera, World Wildlife Fund (WWF); WCS; Conservation International; United Nations Development Program (UNDP). With the participation of countries such as Argentina, Belize, Costa Rica, Honduras, Paraguay, Venezuela, among others, who recognized Mexico’s efforts in conservation and sustainable development policies.

Source: sexenio.com.mx

Watch extraordinary photographs of jaguars by photographer Cherie Pitillo





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