Published On: Thu, Mar 23rd, 2017

Boom in medical tourism to Mexico predicted if Obamacare ends

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On almost any weekday afternoon, silver-haired Americans, often with mouths still numb from Novocain, line up at the U.S. port of entry between Nogales, Mexico, and Nogales, Ariz., according to Caitlin Dickson of Yahoo News.

Because Medicare offers virtually no coverage for dental work, Mexican border towns like Nogales have become go-to destinations for affordable, quality dental care among seniors and snowbirds from southern Arizona, California, and Texas. Less than 10 miles from the popular retirement hub of Yuma, Ariz., more than 350 dentists have set up shop in the small Mexican town of Los Algodones — earning it the nickname “Molar City.”

In recent years, rising medical costs compounded by the introduction of stingy federal exchange plans under the Affordable Care Act have begun to force more Americans to follow the path forged by snowbirds and migrate south of the border in search of affordable health care.

As a result, Mexico has quickly emerged as a world leader in medical tourism, luring an estimated 1 million patients each year, many of them from the U.S. — not just with cheap pharmaceuticals and dental services but also a range of procedures, from heart surgeries to in vitro fertilization and cancer treatments. They can receive care by specialists at high-quality hospitals and clinics for a fraction of the cost in the States.

A medical clinic in Tijuana, Mexico. An estimated 952,000 Californians enter Mexico to receive health care annually, including prescription drugs, according to the U.S. International Trade Commission. (Photo: Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A medical clinic in Tijuana, Mexico. An estimated 952,000 Californians enter Mexico to receive health care annually, including prescription drugs, according to the U.S. International Trade Commission. (Photo: Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images)



Now, as Congress considers a new federal health care law predicted to leave approximately 24 million Americans uninsured by 2026, Mexico’s burgeoning health care industry ironically stands to be among the Republican bill’s biggest beneficiaries.

“Clearly this legislation will set the stage for increased out-of-country care,” said Patrick Goodness, CEO of the Goodness Co., a medical tourism marketing and public relations firm that works with a variety of international hospitals, medical centers and dental clinics.

Though difficult to predict exactly how many Americans will travel outside the U.S. for medical or dental care as a result of the Republican’s proposed American Health Care Act, Goodness told Yahoo News that he’s seen medical tourism from the U.S. steadily increase since 2013, with cost being the biggest driving factor.

To read complete article click here.

For more information on Medical Tourism go to http://www.yucatanhealthcare.com/?lang=en

Source: yahoo.com

Mexico Travel Care

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  1. OverTheWaves says:

    Last week I was in a trip and called my insurance to find a doctor in El Paso TX, it was after hours, on Saturday, they sent me to the hospital where the co-payment will be $100 dollars or $300 if a room is required so I decided to cross the border and received better medical attention, lab test and medicine, everything for $60 full price, once in Mexico I went out for dinner with my wife and spent another $20, wow, can you compare the full medical services and fine dine for $80 vs. $100 of co-payment in US only for the medical visit to the hospital?

  2. Deborah Oda says:

    I have dental insurance through my husband’s employer. They will not even touch you unless everything is pre-approved. I would go to Mexico for any major medical procedure..when I retire.

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