Published On: Sat, Jun 7th, 2014

MADE IN MEXICO: “The Rebozo” in Art, Culture and Fashion

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The Fashion and Textile Museum of London will exhibit 75 ‘rebozos’, some of them of the 18th century. This great collection will be in exhibition from June 5th through August 31st 2014. The museum is located at 83 Bermondsey St, London SE1 3XF,United Kingdom.

Mexican shawls belonging to public and private collections will be exhibited for the first time in London.

The exhibition at the Fashion and Textile Museum under the banner of the Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) includes a wide variety of Mexican shawls (rebozos) made of silk and cotton.

Part of the collection was donated to Franz Mayer Museum in Mexico City by Lady Irene (Everts) Lojan, 92, daughter of the late Belgian diplomat Robert Everts (1875-1942). The exhibition also includes four pieces from the Legorretas and a 9-meter-long rebozo (354 inches) featured in an installation by Mauricio Cervantes.

“They are beautiful shawls of the 18th century, they are gorgeous,” said the curator of the exhibition, Hilary Simon.

The exhibition at the Fashion and Textile Museum under the banner of the Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) includes a wide variety of Mexican shawls made of silk and cotton. (Photo: FASHION AND TEXTILE MUSEUM

The exhibition at the Fashion and Textile Museum under the banner of Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, includes a wide variety of Mexican shawls made of silk and cotton. (Photo: FASHION AND TEXTILE MUSEUM)

Arturo Estrada, expert in backstrap loom, will weave an orange 1.90-meters-long shawl (74 inches) at the museum for five days in order to give visitors an idea of the technique used to make the shawls.

Mexican anthropologist Marta Turok said that even though the silk shawl of San Luis Potosí is very well positioned, others made from Ikat cotton or jasper are in risk of disappearing.

“They are about to disappear from four of six communities. In Chilapa, Guerrero, they already stopped making this kind of rebozos,” Turok explained.

She added that in Zamora, Michoacán, “there is only one maker left, and his children do not want to learn the technique.”

Additionally, there are three workshops in La Piedad and Moroleón and four in Uriangato, while Tenancingo has the largest number of shawl producers.

Source: http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/

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