Published On: Fri, Jan 31st, 2014

Happy Chinese New Year everyone! (Year of the wooden horse)

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For more than a billion people worldwide, the true start to the year arrives Jan. 31, Chinese New Year. Welcome to the year 4712! With the coming Year of the Horse (the Wooden Horse, to be precise), the Lunar Festival promises an extreme year of adventure and romance, and also chaos and market fluctuations (according to the so called Chinese Horoscope).

Chinese New Year, also known as Spring Festival, is the most important celebration in the Chinese calendar. Traditionally, it celebrates the start of the season of ploughing and sowing and the arrival of new life.

The festivities start on the first day of the lunar month  (that is today Friday January 31, 2014), and continue until the fifteenth, when the moon is brightest.

At Chinese New Year, people traditionally wear red clothes and give children so-called lucky money concealed in red envelopes, as a symbol of prosperity and abundance for the year to come.

Chinese are heralding this year the start of the Year of the Horse, and last year was the Year of the Snake.

For more than a billion people worldwide, the true start to the year arrives Jan. 31, Chinese New Year. Welcome to the year 4712! With the coming Year of the Horse (the Wooden Horse, to be precise), the Lunar Festival promises an extreme year of adventure and romance, and also chaos and market fluctuations.

Chinese New Year Celebration Hong Kong

Chinese New Year Celebration Hong Kong

Chinese New Year is the kind of holiday we can all get behind: a 15-day celebration centering around food and family, with traditions designed to attract luck and fortune. Nowhere are the festivities more exciting than in Hong Kong, a vibrant East-meets-West city dripping with glamour and rooted in tradition.

With 7 million people crammed onto a landmass one-third the size of Rhode Island, Hong Kong is often thought of as a pulsating urban jungle. Indeed, you’ll find a city awash in skyscrapers, Michelin-starred restaurants, dapper British bankers and flashy stores eager to max out your credit card.

Lanterns are hung in a Chinese temple (Photo: Reuters)

Lanterns are hung in a Chinese temple (Photo: Reuters)

The story of Chinese immigration to Mexico extends from the late 19th century to the 1930s. By the 1920s, there was a significant population of Chinese nationals, with Mexican wives and Chinese-Mexican children. Most of these were deported in the 1930s to the United States and China with a number being repatriated in the late 1930s and in 1960s. Smaller groups returned from the 1930s to the 1980s. The two main Chinese-Mexican communities are in Mexicali, Baja California and Mexico City but only a few are of pure Chinese blood.

According to the 2010 Census there were 6,655 Chinese immigrants living in Mexico at that time.

 

Sources:

  • Telegraph.co.uk
  • www.radioaustralia.net.au
  • Reuters
  • You Tube

 

Mexico Travel Care

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